artsy fartsy

I’m pretty much out of wall and t-shirt drawer space, so posting about how much I love this bike art page will have to do for now.

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artsy fartsy

I feel good

This article was sent to me by a friend and really does help explain my insistence on riding 99.9% of the time for transportation, even when I have the option of hitching a ride, taking the bus or skipping out altogether. Towards the end of my car ownership, I would always regret it when I drove, but I would feel pressured into driving at times by “bad” weather, running late, or feeling like I had a lot to carry.

 

Now that the option to drive is removed (barring the offers I get from friends, family and coworkers – and even sometimes offers from strangers!), it’s simply a matter of planning. Which sometimes I fail at. Especially that ‘on time’ part, but I was still late to things when I had a car. Anyway, leading up to and since selling my car, the perception of what I can do on a bike has shifted and I hardly think twice about it now. It’s raining? Pack a poncho and a change of clothes in case I need them. Going shopping? Make sure my panniers are empty, or hook on a cargo trailer if we’re getting serious. Now when giving directions I automatically calculate the time and route for biking, and have to adjust when I have to give driving directions (don’t ask me for the nearest parking garage or which highway exit to take!).

 

At any rate, there is a lot that we sacrifice, perhaps without realizing it, when we choose the apparent convenience* of driving a car. And there’s a heck of a lot of joy to be found when you slow your roll. Don’t believe me? Try it yourself!

 

* wouldn’t it be more convenient to skip the gym, save $9k a year, and avoid oil changes and other expensive maintenance? #justsaying

I feel good

Cycling in (part of) Puerto Rico

Well I’m really glad I downloaded the Relive add on for Strava, because this video summary of my one short ride I did on my trip to Puerto Rico last month means I can easily post about the experience (I really will do a post on my Midwest trip, the amount of photos and details to sift through is just still really daunting and extreme-procrastination-inducing).

prsj

 

This was much more of a chill beach vacation versus a bike trip, but thankfully I was able to borrow a bike from the Marriott where we stayed the last 2 nights and get a quick ride in around Old San Juan (and of course I visited the cat sanctuary. More pictures in the aforementioned ride video and on my instagram).

 

While there was evidence of last year’s catastrophic hit from Hurricane Maria, tourism is quickly returning to the island. It was my first visit but I already want to return, but next time I’ll be signing up for or doing something like this trip with Adventure Cycling. While shuttling out to day excursions on the east coast for snorkeling and hiking in the rain forest, we saw many road and mountain bikes on the roads, and while the roads were narrow and certainly more for riders who are comfortable around cars, drivers appeared to be fairly used to and tolerant of sharing the road with cyclists.

 

We ended up following a lot of the pointers in this post from some of my favorite bloggers, although since we were in the busier season we opted for an Airbnb in Condado for most of the trip and didn’t go for Mosquito Bay since it was a full moon and the best time to see the bioluminescence is during a new moon. We thoroughly enjoyed seeing Old San Juan on foot, our day trips out to El Yunque and snorkeling in Culebra, and trying out all the wonderful food (#allthemofongo). If you go, let me know your favorite parts, because I definitely want to return!

 

Cycling in (part of) Puerto Rico